Previous image Up to current index page (1) Next image Here is the wiring diagram for this circuit. The diagram shows it being wired using an Arduino Pro Micro board, which has a built-in USB programming port. The rest of the pictures here show building the same circuit but using a Pro Mini board instead. Either will work fine. Any diode will work, but a 1N5817 is the best kind to use. The Buck converter at top left should output 5.0V. The ethernet module used is a W5500 type, with an onboard 3.3V regulator.See here for the full story. First step: flash the ethernet sketch (program) into the Arduino. Click here to get it. With a Pro Micro board, simply use the built-in USB port for this. But here, we are using Pro Mini boards, so an external 5V TTL serial adapter is used.Normally, the Arduino would have the six-pin header (shown) soldered in place, but we don't want that here (it gets in the way). Instead, insert the header into the end of the TTL programming cable as shown. Now stick the header through the underside of the Arduino Pro Mini. Make sure the six wires are in the correct order. In my set-up, the Orange wire happens to be "DTR" from the serial adapter, so I have ensured that it mates up with the pin labelled "DTR" on the Arduino. The colours of other cables will be different from this one. Lay the assembly down as shown, and lightly apply pressure to the Arduino/header so that it makes contact. Keep a finger on it while uploading the program to it from the Arduino IDE.
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First step: flash the ethernet sketch (program) into the Arduino. Click here to get it. With a Pro Micro board, simply use the built-in USB port for this. But here, we are using Pro Mini boards, so an external 5V TTL serial adapter is used.

Normally, the Arduino would have the six-pin header (shown) soldered in place, but we don't want that here (it gets in the way).

First step: flash the ethernet sketch (program) into the Arduino. Click here to get it. With a Pro Micro board, simply use the built-in USB port for this. But here, we are using Pro Mini boards, so an external 5V TTL serial adapter is used.Normally, the Arduino would have the six-pin header (shown) soldered in place, but we don't want that here (it gets in the way). (z040123817)
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